Company News

Lohocla Moves Forward on New Medication

A new medication under development by Lohocla Research Corporation targets anxiety and chronic pain, two sensations that are just the opposite of what Lohocla’s people must have been feeling when some good news arrived recently. 

Dr. Boris Tabakoff in the lab

The welcome news: Confirmation that the National Institute of Health had approved a Phase II continuation grant of approximately $1 million.  The grant enabled Lohocla to move ahead on FDA-required investigational new drug safety and toxicity studies for Lohocla 201, a promising new medication that attacks anxiety and chronic pain syndromes.

The company, based at the Bioscience Park Center at Fitzsimons, has developed a novel compound that targets the receptors for both maladies.  Pending favorable results of the safety studies, Lohocla 201 seems destined to spark interest among venture capitalists or other investors or partners within the pharma industry to facilitate commercialization of the medication. 

Lohocla’s founder and sole stockholder is Boris Tabakoff, Ph.D., who is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center.  The NIH grant continuation is significant, he says, because, “One of the most difficult transitions you have in developing a new medication comes between the initial basic research stage that shows the efficacy of the drug and moving to the stage where you examine possible toxicity and safety before moving into studies with humans.”

Investors may become interested at the first stage, but everybody is always worried about safety.  “Getting to that second stage takes a large chunk of money as we just received from the NIH.”

Lohocla 201 received U.S. patent protection this past spring and its European patent was issued in 2005.  Lohocla moved into the Colorado Bioscience Park Aurora in 2004 and subsequently expanded into larger laboratory space in early 2006. 

  1. The National Institute of Health (NIH) awarded Lohocla Research Corporation a $1 million grant to be used to research the proteomic markers of alcohol abuse. Lohocla will use this grant to further its research on platelet proteins using novel methods of protein separation, procession and mass-spectral analysis. Lohocla has separated and identified over 600 proteins using these methods and has found several platelet proteins that well reflect the quantities and frequency of ethanol consumed by individuals who can be considered hazardous or harmful drinkers.
  2. The NIH has approved a Phase II continuation grant for approximately $1 million. The grant will enable Lohocla to move ahead on FDA-required investigational new drug safety and toxicity for Kindolor®, a promising new medication for treatment of chronic pain syndromes, anxiety, and brain damage.

Fitzsimons’ Newsletter

Fitzsimons-based Lohocla Moves Forward on New Medication

A new medication under development by Lohocla Research Corporation targets anxiety and chronic pain, two sensations that are just the opposite of what Lohocla’s people must have been feeling when some good news arrived recently.

The welcome news: Confirmation that the National Institute of Health had approved Phase II continuation grant for approximately $1 million. The grant enabled Lohocla to move ahead on FDA-required investigational new drug safety and toxicity studies for Lohocla 201 (Kindolor®), a promising new medication that attacks anxiety and chronic pain syndromes.

The company, based at Fitzsimons’ 160-acre Colorado Bioscience Park in Aurora, has developed a novel compound that targets the receptors for both maladies. Pending favorable results of the safety studies, Lohocla seems destined to spark interest among venture capitalists or other investors or partners within the pharmaceutical industry to facilitate commercialization of the medication.

A major focus of the Fitzsimons Redevelopment Authority is to bring academic medicine and research together to create viable new advances in diagnostics and treatments. Lohocla is a perfect example of the interface between both fields.

Lohocla’s founder and sole stockholder is Boris Tabakoff, Ph.D., who is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. The NIH grant continuation is significant, he says, because, “One of the most difficult transitions you have in developing a new medication comes between the initial, basic-research stage that shows the efficacy of the drug and moving to the stage where you examine possible toxicity and safety before moving into studies with humans. Investors may get interested at the first stage, but everybody is always worried about safety. Getting to the second stage takes a large chunk of money, such as we just received from the NIH.”

Lohocla received U.S. patent protection this past spring and its European patent was issued in 2005.

The company uses genomic, proteomic, and gene array technology together with rational drug design to develop diagnostic and therapeutic products in the areas of chronic pain, mental, and addictive disorders. The company’s proprietary gene, mRNA, and protein diagnostic markers differentially ascertain depression, anxiety, bipolar and addictive disorders.

Founded in Chicago by Dr. Tabakoff in 1983, the company then focused on developing markers for predisposition to a specific form of alcoholism, coupled with tailored medication for treatment. (The company’s name is “alcohol” spelled backwards.) Not long after the launch of his company in 1983, Dr. Tabakoff moved to a post at the NIH, putting Lohocla on hold for ten years. The patented, successful markers still provide revenues to the company, but the alcoholism medication patent lapsed during the ten-year hiatus, allowing other companies to move in and utilize the product.

He restarted the company in Colorado in 1993. Lohocla moved into the Colorado Biosciences Park in Aurora in 2003.


NIH Venture Forum

On June 29th, 2006, Lohocla Research Corporation was invited to attend the NIH Life Sciences Showcase. At the forum, Lohocla had a booth exhibit and a 10-minute presentation on its lead compound Kindolor®, a drug for the treatment of chronic pain.

The NIH Life Sciences Showcase of the Venture Forum highlighted top-quality emerging life science companies funded by the National Institutes of Health. These SBIR Phase II companies were selected to participate in the National Institutes of Health Commercialization Assistance Program (NIH-CAP) and had been awarded an average of $850,000 to develop their technologies.

During two days, the Forum featured over 130 company presentations, 300 company exhibits, and drew over 1,000 attendees. Ten expert panels on innovation and investment models (in two tracks, innovation and investment), comprised the first day; a full "expo" show floor and targeted matchmaking delivered ample networking opportunities. Attendees included policymakers and university leaders, VC investors, angels, and corporate licensing/business development executives scouting for innovative technologies, as well as entrepreneurs exploring strategic alliances and partnership opportunities.